Schedules slip as bigger ships translate into longer turnarounds: SeaIntel
 
CONCERNS over on-time reliability for vessels over 12,000 TEU will be dependent on port authorities and terminal operators handling capability to avoid expanding turnaround times, said maritime analyst SeaIntel's latest report on ocean schedules.
 
On average the trade lane between Asia and north Europe, a vessel of 6,000-TEU capacity port time accounts for 15 per cent of its voyage in port while a 12,000 TEU ship takes some 20 per cent in turnarounds, according to the agency's research.

The one anomaly was in CKYH alliance (Coscon, "K" Line, Yang Ming and Hanjin) showing a higher time in port for its smaller vessels on two of its weekly services.

Turnaround times differ widely - for example, Maersk Line blames two-thirds of its schedule delays on ports and the remaining on vessel operations and weather.

But the Danish carrier still outperformed alliances on the voyage duration of a 9,000 TEU between Asia and northern Europe which saw New World Alliance (MOL, APL and HMM) spending up to 21.4 per cent of its voyage time at port, followed by 19.2 per cent for Grand Alliance (Hapag-Lloyd, OOCL and NYK).

Yet there is a danger for New World and Grand Alliance members in their growing order list for vessels in the 13,000-14,000 TEU range, increases turnarounds 25 per cent and 27 per cent respectively.

The design of its schedules will need to be re-examined to counteract a trend which suggests a "significant scheduling challenge ahead", said the report.

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